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The Richard III Society

Promoting research into the life and times of Richard III since 1924

Patron: HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO

Ricardian Bulletin

March 2014

December 2016

December 2016

June 2017

September 2017

September 2017

 

From the Bulletin's archives

The Ricardian Bulletin, the Society’s quarterly members’ magazine, publishes a number of historical articles in each issue. These are invariably of high quality, often reflecting fresh research into, or new interpretations of, fifteenth century history as it relates to Richard III and his life and times. To enable these articles to reach a wider readership we are making a selection available on the Society’s website.

Too often the narrative of King Richard’s life is dominated by questions over how he became king and the fate of the two sons of Edward IV. The selection below seeks to redress this imbalance and highlight some of the positive and less well known aspects of the king’s life: his strong belief in personal loyalty, his commitment to the fair application of the law, his abilities as an administrator and military commander and his religious faith. We also explore the influence of his father, Richard duke of York and the visit of Nicolas von Popplau to the king’s court in 1484.

Over time we will be adding further articles from the Bulletin’s archive to the Society’s website. To receive and see the range of articles included in the Ricardian Bulletin, you will need to join the Society.

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March 2014:

Richard III and the Men who Died in Battle’ by the late Lesley Boatwright, the late Moira Habberjam and Peter Hammond.

‘One thing we know absolutely for certain about Richard III is that he prized loyalty: his chosen motto proves it. He must also have been aware from a very early age that a man’s ultimate loyalty was to follow his lord into battle …. (his) concern for the souls of the men who died at Towton may well have sprung from his personal religious feelings about what was due to the dead, but it also points to a real appreciation of their loyal sacrifice.’ Full article.

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December 2016:

‘Like father, like son: Richard, duke of York and Richard III’ by Matthew Lewis.

‘I believe that the lives of these two fascinating men followed some striking parallels, even down to their deaths in battle when York might have awaited reinforcements safe inside Sandal Castle and Richard III might not have charged across the field to try and end opposition to him once and for all.’ Full article.

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December 2016:

Richard III and St Ninian’ by Sandra Pendlington

‘Thomas Turpie, one of the leading Scottish historians of the early Scottish saints, describes Richard, duke of Gloucester, as ‘the most high profile patron’ of the cult of St Ninian in the fifteenth century. Who was St Ninian and why did Richard III choose him as his patron saint?’ Full article.

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June 2017:

Richard III and ‘our poor subject Katherine Bassingbourne'. by David Johnson

‘Richard’s concern for the law will, of course, come as little surprise to Ricardians. Importantly, however, the relative obscurity of the Katherine Bassingbourne case provides additional significant evidence of the king’s determination to secure justice for all – regardless of wealth, rank, or social condition.’ Full article.

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Sept 2017:

Richard III and Scotland’ by David Santiuste

‘... in the Scottish wars of the early 1480s Richard gained valuable experience of independent command (quickly adapting his strategy when necessary), as well as enhancing his reputation as a leader of men: this must be seen as a vital factor in the events that followed Edward IV’s death, irrespective of Richard’s motives.’ Full article.

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Sept 2017:

The loveliest music and the Turkish frontier itself: von Popplau’s day with King Richard’ by Marie Barnfield

‘Not only is Edward of Middleham’s date of death unrecorded, but so also are the date and place of his burial...many Ricardians have begun to wonder whether the sung Mass, and the feast that followed, which the Silesian knight Nicolas von Popplau attended with King Richard on Monday 3 May, may have been connected with the prince’s funeral or week’s mind.’ Full article.

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